Journalist | Poet

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Samira Sadeque is a New York-based Bangladeshi journalist and poet focusing on migration, the refugee crisis, gender, and mental health. She completed her M.S. in Journalism from Columbia Journalism School in 2017.

Her work appears in Reuters, NPR, Al Jazeera, Quartz, The Lily, AJ+, The Wire.in, Scroll.in, and the Dhaka Tribune among other publications. She is the editor of the Bangladeshi Identity Project. More here

Samira’s poetry appears, or is forthcoming, in In Full Color Anthology (2019), No Dear Magazine (2019), Six Seasons Review (2013, 2015, 2016) and ActiveMuse (2018). More here.

She is a 2019 Best Of The Net nominee, and 2018 South Asian Journalists Association award nominee.


SPOTLIGHT

Why Black Lives Matter and Sikh activists came out for Kashmir

Al Jazeera, September 2019

Sikh activists, Black Lives Matter activists, and Pakistan's Christian minorities came out for Kashmiris for massive protests outside the UN while Indian PM Narendra Modi delivered his speech at UNGA. For all the protesters, though from different backgrounds, it was the shared struggle of being marginalized in their own lands.

Full portfolio here.

‘The City as a Death Sentence’

2018 BUTTON POETRY VIDEO CONTEST: HONORARY MENTION

All articles of blog posts, photography, poetry copyrighted to Samira Sadeque. Use without permission of the author is strictly prohibited.

If you have any queries regarding publishing or re-publishing any of her work, please contact her here


Gender - migration - child-marriage - LGBT activism in Bangladesh, - spoiled art - refugees - the man driving the Uber

Gender - migration - child-marriage - LGBT activism in Bangladesh, - spoiled art - refugees - the man driving the Uber

The world in numbers and dots

The world in numbers and dots


 
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Cover image:

A wall mural at a downtown cafe in Ho Chi Minh, May 2015.

Ellipses and missed commas

Ellipses and missed commas

Homes. Losses. Returnings. Arrivings.

Homes. Losses. Returnings. Arrivings.


All photography by Samira Sadeque unless otherwise stated.